Human Rights Protection


To defend the universal values of human rights and observe the R.O.C. Constitution and international laws, we advocate human rights education and support human rights protection, and have proudly fought in landmark human rights cases on behalf of clients and taken on follow-up work on a pro bono basis.

  • Advocating for the right to participate in political activities under the constitutional system – Assisting Ms. Liu Hsia (Hsing-Lin-Tzu) in applying for a constitutional interpretation by the Justices of the Constitutional Court.
    Ms. Liu Hsia (Hsing-Lin-Tzu) was a legislative candidate in 1989. However, because her education did not continue beyond elementary school and thus she did not meet the eligibility criteria of Section 1, Article 32 of the Public Servant Election and Recall Law promulgated during the Period of Mobilization for Suppression of the Communist Rebellion (renamed the Civil Servants Election and Recall Act on August 2, 1991), the Ministry of Examination rejected her application for acceptance of her educational background. The court also dismissed her claim. In response to Lee and Li's petition for a constitutional interpretation filed on Ms. Liu's behalf, the Justices of the Constitutional Court rendered Interpretation No. 290 in 1992, holding that the restrictions on educational background and work experience of candidates for all levels of elected representatives in Section 1, Article 32 of the Public Servant Election and Recall Law are not unconstitutional. However, the Justices in the interpretation also pointed out that such restrictions should be reevaluated in light of the popularity of education among people. If the restrictions continue to be necessary, their merit and the circumstances of those who had difficulty completing their education should be considered. Such decision should be made through the reasonable discretion of the legislature. Afterwards, this case received widespread attention, and the Civil Servants Election and Recall Act, amended on November 1, 2000, eliminated all restrictions on the educational background and work experience of election candidates.